Difference between salsa and timba?

Discussion in 'Salsa Music' started by El Conguero, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao

    It never hurts to ask for specific songs that reflect your taste. But again, "we " to a greater or lesser degree, need to cater to our audience ( even requests ). If I have an audience that is somewhat new to the scene, then my dura will be introduced over the period of the gig.
    Here's a situation where the format could be much more in the Romantica stylings. Certain clubs in Tampa, cater to that style, but, primarily due to the fact that , the majority are older Cubano's . The most successful DJ there, was a Cuban radio DJ with a large following. So much so that, when he quit, the club closed within 3 months !

    Salsa radio stations are also driven by program format ,and there are stations that lean more to hard core and, as to Amazon, they have found a market for their selections, plus a lot of that is very old, and subsequently cheaper .
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2017
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  2. Marcos

    Marcos Son Montuno

    It seems we're getting into a chicken VS the egg argument here. If I am requesting particular songs, I am by definition an audience member, and therefore under your logic my requests should influence the type of music that is going to be played. If on the other hand the audience is this nebulous undefined concept that only the DJ knows, then we get into a situation where I will question whether those are indeed the audiences' tastes or they are the DJs.

    Do you by any chance know Juan Paredes? He's a Dominican dance instructor in Tampa, about 5'9", brown skinned, was associated with Salsa Caliente dance studio for some time (I don't know now). Apparently a few months ago he was complaining in social media about the mixing of salsa songs by DJs in the Tampa nightclubs, his comments went viral with a lot of people agreeing that mixing was not a good thing and many in the audience didn't like it. I went to the Roundup in Tampa on latin night in mid February, where a DJ that was specifically called out for mixing would be spinning. The DJ continued to mix the salsa songs, in spite of the many negative comments on the practice, much to our group's dismay. So much for catering to the audience.

    BTW, What old stuff are you talking about? The last of what I've bought and reviewed (within salsa & salsa like) was Pepitin, Palo!, La Maxima 79, Yumi Gipsy Band, Soltron, Elito Reve y su Charangon, Los Hacheros, and Calle Real. The recommendations I get from Amazon include Don Perignon, Ismael Miranda, Victor Manuelle, and the Banco Popular Christmas specials; and in fact none of the above purchased material was recommended for me.
     
  3. Hanginon

    Hanginon Changui

    I'm fortunate as a DJ - I play to mostly older dancers, so I can jam to Salsa Dura all evening, and I don't mix. Heck, us older people need a break between songs to catch our breath and change partners!

    Music, like all things in life, goes in cycles, and right now IMHO we are in a low point in the cycle. Rap, Dubstep, and Reggaeton - young people (black, white, and Latin) who can do incredible physical feats, have fun by themselves in a closet, but who (perhaps with the exception of Bachata) are loosing the art of partner dancing - and by "partner dancing", I do not mean grind circles. Hopefully, at some point, the pendulum will start to swing back, but the big money is on music I don't even want to listen to.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2017
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  4. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao

    I left the Tampa area in '02, and no, I do not know the guy you named. As to the DJs there, mixing was de riguer ( same in Atlanta ) and oddly, I NEVER heard a complaint .The opposition to non mix, is a recent phenom. , and I do see merit in the argument.

    As to the music buying selection goes, my references were primarily to all those compilations , that newbies get hooked on ( I've had numerous students tell me about their CD collection , with those types ) .
     
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  5. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao

    With you on that one !!... and the 2nd para..
     
  6. Marcos

    Marcos Son Montuno

    I started dancing and listening to salsa in 02 and was a regular club goes 03 though 05 in Tampa, left the city due to work. Memory fails me as to whether they were mixing or not, I think they might have been and I might not have noticed it as that was where I started dancing. I did not realize this was an issue until I went back this year and this came up, where I was confused as to whether or not a particular song had ended because they were mixing very similar songs, outright cutting the end of the songs, making for awkward moments in the dance floor.

    What I want to explain is that as a beginner I didn't know about the different categories of salsa. Because as a child my favorites had been Hector Lavoe and Willie Colon, I never even realized a Gilberto Santa Rosa album would only contain love songs until I bought one as an adult getting into salsa. And only later, after buying more and learning more, did I get a healthy scepticism of not only Santa Rosa, but pretty much all solo singers. Then some time after that I figured out I wasn't into salsa as a preteen and teenager because salsa romantica was the only new stuff that was getting airplay by the early 90s, up until I left Puerto Rico in the mid 90s and went to live in the American south, truly a latin music desert at that time. The only broad and balanced source of good salsa music I remember while in Tampa was the Cable TV music channel, I don't think anywhere else in the city played new charanga, timba, and progressive salsa.

    Maybe I wasn't the average beginner, and you've discussed why they listen to specific artists and it's indeed the case there was a preference for salsa romantica artists over hard salsa artists, and please let me know if that's the case. But for my experience, I din't prefer salsa romantica even though I consumed it, I just didn't understand it was a thing at all and that there were much better choices. But even if I wasn't the average beginner, I'm sure many others shared my experiences.
     
  7. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao

    Yep, all the DJs " mixed ",
    I had left Tampa at the end of 2002, so we just crossed paths .


    as to the "South ", Atlanta had several 1st class DJs ( the best was Tito, from PR ) lotsa Dura ,and in the club In which I played in Atlanta, I used a good mix of dura .

    There was also a Colombian DJ in Atlanta, who owned a music store, and his gigs often used Vinyl .

    Which clubs did you visit whilst in Tampa ?.. the Wed. nite gig on Dale Mabry, always drew a packed house, The new owners took over in around 2000 , and put the DJ booth at centre rear, which screwed up the dance floor !
     
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  8. Hanginon

    Hanginon Changui

    There is something that a lot of dancers and DJ's don't understand. What keeps the doors open and pays the bills at the clubs is the bar. DJ "sets" need to allow for breaks so people can get drinks, and hard core Salsa dancers, most of whom do not really consume much alcohol, need to still be buying lots of water/soda and dropping tips! Unfortunately, you can have a packed floor and actually not be making money.
     
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  9. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao

    In some latino clubs, it's surprising how many people just sit and chat all nite ( and just buy drinks )../
     
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  10. DJ Yuca

    DJ Yuca El Sabroso de Conguero

    That's known as rotating the dancefloor. If it actually works then great, but many - probably most - people on the salsa scene will not spend money at the bar, No matter what the DJ does. In which case the only solution is for the promoter to attract the type of people who don't go to salsa events anymore, or (perhaps more easily) to ensure that the venue hire paid by the promoter is enough to compensate the venue for the relatively poor bar takings they will inevitably receive.
     
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  11. Marcos

    Marcos Son Montuno

    Studio Inc was in Dale Mabry, I remember it would sort of be seasonal, which is to say they would be hot for a while, and cold for a while there after, I can't remember which nights I went there, our salsa classes were held there for a while in 2004, I don't remember another place where that alternated between DJs and live events like Studio Inc did. Hyde Park Café, in the Hyde Park area with latin night on Thursdays, was a great place because it had the dance floor and tables separated by a wall and a door, so if a girl was hanging out at the dance area it was more likely that she wanted to dance and I wasn't wasting so much time trying to ask out girls that didn't want to dance, while the other area wasn't that loud so non dancers or dancers who wanted a break could actually talk to one another while sitting down to order and sip their drinks.

    There were other places that came and went, I remember a gigantic venue in Dale Mabry that was fairly popular but phased out latin night after about six months and another place in Hillsborough avenue on Wednesday nights (but I can't remember name).

    BTW, I moved to the south when I was 15, so I wasn't going to 21+ nightclubs, and there was zero Latin music radio stations.
     
  12. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao

    I guess , after 15 years, a lot changes, however, with a vibrant latino population, there should be some good nites..
     
  13. Marcos

    Marcos Son Montuno

    Where I live one promoter has been booking restaurants. They charge a high fee, 3500 Yen (about 32 USD), but it includes a buffet and all you can drink beer and wine. I probably eat more than the average Japanese person so it works great for me.
     
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  14. DJ Yuca

    DJ Yuca El Sabroso de Conguero

    Sounds good. My experience of the salsa scene is that people will pay whatever they have to to get in, but when it comes to spending money voluntarily, for many it simply won't happen. I did a free night once where one guy was there before I even arrived and stayed right to the end, doing the lesson and dancing all night, and he didn't drink anything all night. (I also happen to know that on a non-salsa night out this guy wouldn't hesitate to have a few beers.) Needless to say I have no plans to do any more free nights.
     
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  15. DJ Yuca

    DJ Yuca El Sabroso de Conguero

    I went to a salsa night in Italy years ago where the cost of entry also included a buffet. The food was pretty decent and I certainly got my money's worth!
     
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  16. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao

    The "Sanctuary " club in Atlanta , gave a free late " breakfast" on Sat. nites..
     
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  17. DJ Yuca

    DJ Yuca El Sabroso de Conguero

    32USD is a lot of money, although I believe Japan has a high cost of living generally. Are there many people willing to pay that much?
     
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  18. Marcos

    Marcos Son Montuno

    Not so many, maybe 20-30 people, but I live in a small city, and the restaurant is small and couldn't handle a large crowd. The food is good quality, it's hard to find crappy food in Japan, when I've gone there on a normal night I'll spend about 3000 Yen for my meal, so an extra 500 more for buffet and salsa is a good deal. It's an Italian Japanese joint, yet for the buffet it's a mix of their normal offerings and more standard Japanese fare.

    If we want spectacular latin music and dance we need to travel to Fukuoka and do like Juan Luis Guerra. I used to do it a lot when I was single, but it's very difficult with small children.
     
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  19. Hanginon

    Hanginon Changui

    Our local Latin Club does this as well - but cover your ears if the rice isn't done exactly right!! :(
     
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