Books

Discussion in 'Member Reviews' started by terence, Apr 6, 2013.

  1. DJ Yuca

    DJ Yuca El Sabroso de Conguero

    From the little information available it looks potentially very interesting. Not cheap though, particularly for those of us having to import it (it would probably incur customs charges that would add an extra 11 to 15 pounds) but I'd certainly like to read it.
     
    #21
  2. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao

  3. MAMBO_CEC

    MAMBO_CEC Sabor Ambassador

  4. Salsa Student

    Salsa Student Pattern Police

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  5. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao


    But that aint about Mambo...
     
  6. MAMBO_CEC

    MAMBO_CEC Sabor Ambassador

  7. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao


    By her age, she was not around to give first hand empirical context. There has been so much written about mambo, and by most, who did not live thru the period.
    So, it depends upon whom she interviewed, and their experiences; its a very complex genre, with false pathways, as has been show over a period of time.

    Musically, the dance is much easier to trace to "roots ", but from a practical standpoint, there is an East and West coast story that "knits " the story together( and that is empirical evidence ).
     
  8. Salsa Student

    Salsa Student Pattern Police

    That's true, but I think it's safe to say that Juliet is an actual dance professional and not just someone who decided to take up teaching after dancing socially for a year.
     
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  9. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao


    At least, Richie has had access to some old timers in NY, but even so, that is only half the story,,,

    Living thru a genre ( a new paradigm ) gives a much truer insite, and even then, if one is only there for "dancing " the chances are slim, much like today,in that only a few, ever took an in depth look at the scene, from a wider viewpoint than their local establishment.

    To remember , air travel was in its infancy in the 50s ( I drove all over the States to dance and primarily , teach ). In addition, there was not the abundance of venues as today. .
    Major cities.like LA , NY and Miami, frequently employed all the well known bands , but with little publicity, until the A.Murray dance show featured mambo..

    I actually worked for the teacher ( who had gone on to be a successful owner ) who had danced with another A.M teacher, in the TV program.

    Ironically she just got mentioned on dance forums ( Pat Traymore ). She used to visit the Dallas AM studio, where I was working as a pro-tem .manager .
    By the way, his name was Terry Leone, and was Mrs Murrays personal teacher in NYC .
    That was by the way, the only studio AM owned.. the rest were franchised.
     
  10. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao


    Teaching a " dance " does not necessarily provide empirical root evidence. I teach numerous styles, and dances, but, would I consider myself an expert in all ? no, but a good working knowledge in the genres that I am able to teach. .

    By the way, I cant even count the numbers of high profile teachers I know, and have judged with, who have little desire, or knowledge , beyond teaching the "dance " from a technical aspect.

    Let me give you a very, very recent e.g... I just acquired a new salsa student with 4/5 yrs experience with many so called experts.He had NEVER been told, or heard any of them mention , " Son ".. I guess why bother, its only the root , of all that we dance :rolleyes:
     
  11. DJ Yuca

    DJ Yuca El Sabroso de Conguero

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  12. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao


    Its always about NYC.. as I said David, the W. coast was equally as vibrant and yet, its like a stepchild .

    There were more famous people. for e.g. ( Hollywood types ) taking lessons in a week, probably, than anywhere else in the world .Never a mention by biographers as a side note ,bolstering its popularity in that time period
    .
    I have 2 contempories in the States, who have also devoted their working life to. " dance ". Both are still active ( the vid you posted for me is one ) and he still only teaches mambo as does the other, They never get approached , for info. and yet, both worked in major metro cities, teaching full time, and had high profile.


    Nite club experiences are fine and well, but, they NEVER tell the whole story .
     
  13. terence

    terence Maestro 'Descarga' Cachao

    I just read the whole post. As I noted. just repeating the same old things that has been said before. Not a mention about the Crescendo and Virginias in LA .Neither the many high profile dancers like Rocky Mari and Steve Peck to name but a few. Must not forget to mention Natalia who became very good friends with Puente ( he actually danced with her in the club ) and Jan who taught in the club when not in use .Props also to the Rivera twins and Doug .

    it's worth mentioning that, at the studio in which I worked in LA, we had the son of a very high profile TV performer. training as a teacher. And if anyone remembers the Dagwood and Blondie show, the little girl " cookie " also trained in my studio .

    And here's a NYC one.. Charles Durning , the actor ( he sadly passed 2 years ago ) was my only Gold level teacher in my NYC studio ( I was the DD )..another latin proponent.

    ALL were mambo freaks !!.. All of this is part and parcel of the " mambo " story that's never told .

    And yes.. I've been asked to write a book very recently ( members on Dance forums ) and ironically, I, do not feel qualified .
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2015
  14. DJ Yuca

    DJ Yuca El Sabroso de Conguero

    The name of the site is Palladium Mambo so I assume it is set out to be NY-centric rather than a document of the era throughout the US.

    Maybe you should contact the lady in question and see if she would be interested in documenting the W Coast scene? (Or maybe she has already done that in her new book. Still she may well be interested in further recollections from those who were there.)

    To be fair she has done 8 bios of dancers of the era, using interviews with those still around and children of those no longer with us:
    http://www.palladium-mambo.com/index.shtml#dancers
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2015
  15. MAMBO_CEC

    MAMBO_CEC Sabor Ambassador

    I am sure she would love to hear about it from the West Coast perspective. Great Idea DJ Yuca!
     
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  16. calichris10

    calichris10 Sabor Ambassador

    Many many history books have been written by people who didn't live through the events. Why not give her a chance? Maybe she has a different insight. & Its awesome that she loves the music & dance enough to dedicate her time to write a book. She is an awesome dancer BTW!!!!
     
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  17. lidiap

    lidiap Descarga

    Jeez Terence! Juliet is not a salsa teacher but an academic (PhD too!) and she took that kind of approach with her book. It took her nine years to research it and write it. Not that you're expected to know that, but maybe we should first read the book and then comment?
     
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  18. lidiap

    lidiap Descarga

  19. calichris10

    calichris10 Sabor Ambassador

    She actually does teach salsa and is a fantastic dancer, very elegant. I will be reading her book! Thanks for posting the link :)
     
  20. lidiap

    lidiap Descarga

    I was responding to terence who implied (or so I thought) that the book came out of her activity as a salsa teacher when in fact it came out of her being a dance academic. I don't want to debate this - yes, Juliet has been teaching salsa but only very marginally, now and again, that's not her main thing. You can look up what she actually does on the University of Washington website. BTW, I know her. Indeed, she is a beautiful dancer.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2015

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